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Members of the Eminent Persons Group on Nepal-India Relations pose for a photograph with Nepal's Foreign Minister Kamal Thapa during their first meeting in Kathmandu, on Monday, July 4, 2016. Photo: RSS
Members of the Eminent Persons Group on Nepal-India Relations pose for a photograph with Nepal's Foreign Minister Kamal Thapa during their first meeting in Kathmandu, on Monday, July 4, 2016. Photo: RSS

Nepal seeks revision of 1950 treaty, India not positive

By Our Reporter

Members of the Eminent Persons Group on Nepal-India Relations pose for a photograph with Nepal's Foreign Minister Kamal Thapa during their first meeting in Kathmandu, on Monday, July 4, 2016. Photo: RSS
Members of the Eminent Persons Group on Nepal-India Relations pose for a photograph with Nepal’s Foreign Minister Kamal Thapa during their first meeting in Kathmandu, on Monday, July 4, 2016. Photo: RSS

The third meeting of the Eminent Persons’ Group on Nepal-India Relations (EPG-NIR) that ended last Thursday made no meaningful breakthrough although the Nepali side strongly put forth Nepal’s demand seeking revision of the controversial provisions of the 1950 Peace and Friendship Treaty.
Held after two postponements, the third EPG meeting became just a business as usual. When the Nepali side demanded amendment to the controversial provisions, the Indian side agreed to further study the provisions of the treaty.
However, the Nepalese side claimed the meeting concluded in a positive tone.
“We shared all things by incorporating each part and parcel in the meeting held in a peaceful manner. The Indian side listened to our presentations attentively,” Bheikh Bahadur Thapa, coordinator of the Nepali group said while addressing a press meet organised at the end of the two-day meeting.
The 1950 Treaty which India signed with Nepal three years after its independence has been one of the contentious issues of Nepal-India relations.
India had forwarded the draft of the treaty with an ill intention when democratic movement against the Rana rule was taking momentum in Nepal. Interestingly, the Indian leaders who were supporting the democratic movement of 1950 in Nepal, compelled Rana Prime Minister Mohan Shumsher to ink the treaty, and Mohan Shumsher agreed to sign it with a hope of receiving Indian backing to remain in power. However, he was deceived. Had the Indian leaders been honest friend of Nepal, they should have waited restoration of democracy to ink the same. Hence, one could easily guess what Indian establishment intended by forwarding the draft treaty in the ill time.
As a result, even 66 years after the inking of the Treaty Nepalese feel pain, especially due to provisions included in its Articles 2, 5, 6 and 7. Provisions of these articles undermine Nepal’s sovereignty and put it at a distinct disadvantage in terms of trade, economic development and movement of people of two nations. Nepal objects to these provisions as they give India an upper hand to dictate former’s foreign and security affairs.
Most communist leaders objected to the treaty when they were not in power. Only ManamohanAdhikari, when he was PM of Nepal in 1995 dared to raise the issue during his India visit. Contrary to Adhikari, present PM Pushpa Kamal Dahal, who once announced to launched tunnel war against India, reached the power in the full backing of India.
Everyone agrees they need to be replaced by the new ones in the spirit of changed domestic, regional and global dynamism, but the Indian side has been reluctant to listen to Nepal in one pretext or another.
It was the first time that India and Nepal formally discussed the treaty article-wise, but still India managed to avoid its revision in the immediate future. The next EPG meeting is scheduled for May in Deharadun, India.Nepal seeks revision of 1950 treaty, India not positive
By Our Reporter
The third meeting of the Eminent Persons’ Group on Nepal-India Relations (EPG-NIR) that ended last Thursday made no meaningful breakthrough although the Nepali side strongly put forth Nepal’s demand seeking revision of the controversial provisions of the 1950 Peace and Friendship Treaty.
Held after two postponements, the third EPG meeting became just a business as usual. When the Nepali side demanded amendment to the controversial provisions, the Indian side agreed to further study the provisions of the treaty.
However, the Nepalese side claimed the meeting concluded in a positive tone.
“We shared all things by incorporating each part and parcel in the meeting held in a peaceful manner. The Indian side listened to our presentations attentively,” Bheikh Bahadur Thapa, coordinator of the Nepali group said while addressing a press meet organised at the end of the two-day meeting.
The 1950 Treaty which India signed with Nepal three years after its independence has been one of the contentious issues of Nepal-India relations.
India had forwarded the draft of the treaty with an ill intention when democratic movement against the Rana rule was taking momentum in Nepal. Interestingly, the Indian leaders who were supporting the democratic movement of 1950 in Nepal, compelled Rana Prime Minister Mohan Shumsher to ink the treaty, and Mohan Shumsher agreed to sign it with a hope of receiving Indian backing to remain in power. However, he was deceived. Had the Indian leaders been honest friend of Nepal, they should have waited restoration of democracy to ink the same. Hence, one could easily guess what Indian establishment intended by forwarding the draft treaty in the ill time.
As a result, even 66 years after the inking of the Treaty Nepalese feel pain, especially due to provisions included in its Articles 2, 5, 6 and 7. Provisions of these articles undermine Nepal’s sovereignty and put it at a distinct disadvantage in terms of trade, economic development and movement of people of two nations. Nepal objects to these provisions as they give India an upper hand to dictate former’s foreign and security affairs.
Most communist leaders objected to the treaty when they were not in power. Only ManamohanAdhikari, when he was PM of Nepal in 1995 dared to raise the issue during his India visit. Contrary to Adhikari, present PM Pushpa Kamal Dahal, who once announced to launched tunnel war against India, reached the power in the full backing of India.
Everyone agrees they need to be replaced by the new ones in the spirit of changed domestic, regional and global dynamism, but the Indian side has been reluctant to listen to Nepal in one pretext or another.
It was the first time that India and Nepal formally discussed the treaty article-wise, but still India managed to avoid its revision in the immediate future. The next EPG meeting is scheduled for May in Deharadun, India.

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